Things Change, People Transition: Change as a Process


In general, change isn’t complicated, but it is complex. In its simplest form we use terms Ways people respond to changelike; to alter, shift, adjust, move, switch, transfer, etc. Change is a transformation or transition from one phase, condition, or state, to another.

From a change management perspective, assumptions that each individual impacted by a new initiative will always experience change on time, on budget and on schedule, is flawed, because this approach lacks context and doesn’t always consider the people side of change. It may not consider outcomes and results after the change or ask what behaviors need to change and be sustained. Organizational and personal change have to be approached and measured differently . The model is not linear and no two individuals move through each phase the same.

Organizational and personal change have to be approached and measured differently because no one will embrace or resist change the same.Behavior doesn’t happen in a predictive order and as a result, it is imperative to think about change as a process, rather than a project.

Things change. People transition.

The change curve was created in the 1960s by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross as a way to explain the grieving process. Over time, it has evolved as a tool to help people understand responses and reactions to significant change. The curve is a way to understand how people transition and that getting from point A to point B can be complex.

Kakie Fitzsimmons ADKAR Change ManagementSince change is a non-linear process, some people may take two steps forward and one step back along this curve for a number of reasons.

Being successful and getting to the reinforcement and sustain page requires a number of important inputs some of which could include the following.

 

  1. Leadership alignment  – Does leadership agree on the messaging and go forward plan? Is that senior leader in charge accessible and available to the change leaders?
  2. Communication – Ensuring the right messaging goes to the right people at the right time from the right leader.
  3. Integration – research demonstrates that when project and change management are successfully brought together, the changes can be up to 97% more successful.
  4. Active listening – Is there a two way flow of communication that allows the people on the front lines to be seen and heard?
  5. Involvement– Has everyone involved in the change had the opportunity to heavy input so they feel they are part of the process?

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Individual and Organizational Change Management Integration Plan


Kakie Fitzsimmons Prosci Individual and Organizational Change Management Integration Plan

The complexity that accompanies change and the process that goes along with it means different things to different people. As a result, it is important to view change through two lenses ;  individuals, and organizations because they are parts of a complex system. This intricacy blends art, science, culture, inputs, outputs, feedback, leadership, strategy, governance, competency, internal and external forces, change impacts, individual needs, and values, management practices, change activities, skills, communications planning and more. Read more of this post

Circles of Meaning


Once in a while, I like participating in the “Weekly Photo Challenge” over at The Daily Post. A new meme comes out each Friday and I think about the proposed topic. I wonder what I could say about it and what my readers will be interested in as well. This week, Cheri asks us to let a shape, a circle, inspire us.

Circles Change Management Business TimeI took this picture at the James J. Hill Business Library because it had a certain old world charm that grabbed my attention. I like the concept of time as it relates to the evolution of knowledge throughout the ages.

Circles have been used metaphorically since the beginning of history. In many cultures, they represent unity, enlightenment, divinity, and protection. At first glance, a circle can seem simple, yet they are one of the most common and universal signs used throughout the history of the world.

Circles have symbolic use in divinity: For example, with Taoism, the Yin Circles of Concern Influence Change ControlYang image embodies two forces in the universe that are opposites that balance one another. Hinduism uses the Dharma Chakra to represent the wheel of law that leads to enlightenment. Artists have used halos in Christianity and Buddhism to symbolize light and holiness. Paganism circles exemplified supernatural forces, and in ancient times Celtics stood inside of circles for protection. Read more of this post