Forming the Basis for Revolutionary Change in Organizations


Many of our traditional business system models have evolved out of the industrial age and are no longer relevant. As a result, we need to adjust paradigms towards a new way of thinking. We will refer to this new thought process as the “emerging mindset“.

Today’s businesses are in a constant state of flux, adjusting in ways that entail combinations of reacting to unplanned fires blended with strategic planning. The external economic atmosphere is changing so fast that often, internal environments are unable to keep up, making organizations complex and more vulnerable than ever.

Our world has seen the intense progression in technology as of late, pushing us into a mode of hyper-connectivity, creating new open global capital market economies and new business models, impacting open global capital market economies and new business models, impacting internal and external environmental factors in organizations. As a result, many businesses that were in place five or even ten years ago have ceased to exist.

Categories of Innovation, Wheelan and Hunger 2012 13th ed

 Many organizational cultures are in the midst of punctuated equilibrium we refer to as Revolutionary Change as they attempt to seek the right amount of stability. 

The emerging mindset will need to constantly scan what is happening on the outside, monitor the expectations of behavior complexity, maintain alignment of strategic direction and plan how to begin the momentum in new ways that get everyone participating and excited about a new vision for the future. The new mindset will need to innovate and continue asking what can be done differently and whether anything is being missed. The consequences of not doing so have far-reaching implications. 

Factors Involved in Revolutionary Change

Categories of innovation to leverage when forming the basis for revolutionary change. Adapted from C. Hickman and C. Raia, “Incubating Innovation,” Journal of Business Strategy (May/June 2002), p. 15. Reprinted with permission, Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

Revolutionary change happens when something shakes an organization, presenting a clear need for a major overhaul, which will change the culture because the enterprise will never be the same again. Both revolutionary and constant, accelerating change are very different because accelerating change evolves gradually. (Hence the term, evolutionary change).

Revolutionary change is not linear or constant. It is the chaos that disturbs the organization and leads to the reshaping of its culture. Examples could include an unforeseen crisis, a merger or acquisition, new leadership comes in, and changes business models and structure of organizations change, which may involve the process of forming a new vision and mission.

Read more of this post

Things Change, People Transition: Change as a Process


In general, change isn’t complicated, but it is complex. In its simplest form we use terms Ways people respond to changelike; to alter, shift, adjust, move, switch, transfer, etc. Change is a transformation or transition from one phase, condition, or state, to another.

From a change management perspective, assumptions that each individual impacted by a new initiative will always experience change on time, on budget and on schedule, is flawed, because this approach lacks context and doesn’t always consider the people side of change. It may not consider outcomes and results after the change or ask what behaviors need to change and be sustained. Organizational and personal change have to be approached and measured differently . The model is not linear and no two individuals move through each phase the same.

Organizational and personal change have to be approached and measured differently because no one will embrace or resist change the same.Behavior doesn’t happen in a predictive order and as a result, it is imperative to think about change as a process, rather than a project.

Things change. People transition.

The change curve was created in the 1960s by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross as a way to explain the grieving process. Over time, it has evolved as a tool to help people understand responses and reactions to significant change. The curve is a way to understand how people transition and that getting from point A to point B can be complex.

Kakie Fitzsimmons ADKAR Change ManagementSince change is a non-linear process, some people may take two steps forward and one step back along this curve for a number of reasons.

Being successful and getting to the reinforcement and sustain page requires a number of important inputs some of which could include the following.

 

  1. Leadership alignment  – Does leadership agree on the messaging and go forward plan? Is that senior leader in charge accessible and available to the change leaders?
  2. Communication – Ensuring the right messaging goes to the right people at the right time from the right leader.
  3. Integration – research demonstrates that when project and change management are successfully brought together, the changes can be up to 97% more successful.
  4. Active listening – Is there a two way flow of communication that allows the people on the front lines to be seen and heard?
  5. Involvement– Has everyone involved in the change had the opportunity to heavy input so they feel they are part of the process?

If you found this post hought-provoking, please share it with others and thank you for visiting my blog!

Individual and Organizational Change Management Integration Plan


Kakie Fitzsimmons Prosci Individual and Organizational Change Management Integration Plan

The complexity that accompanies change and the process that goes along with it means different things to different people. As a result, it is important to view change through two lenses ;  individuals, and organizations because they are parts of a complex system. This intricacy blends art, science, culture, inputs, outputs, feedback, leadership, strategy, governance, competency, internal and external forces, change impacts, individual needs, and values, management practices, change activities, skills, communications planning and more. Read more of this post

Engagement: Change Management and Project Integration


Change Management and Project Plan IntegrationFocusing on the people side of change is arguably one of the most important tasks as we begin phase one of preparing for a change initiative (as seen in the slide below). In the early phases of a project, we are seeking to understand the nature of the change and preparing the organization for it. Exceptional change management works when we partner with leadership to ensure timely and consistent messaging, early and often. In this illustration, I like to think of the section between project and change management as a zipper that will pull everything together.

According to Prosci’s annual benchmarking research on change, the greatest overall contributor to project success is active and visible sponsorshipAs facilitators’ of the change, we have a unique opportunity to bring sponsors along on the journey, providing guidance and giving them tools that will help to mitigate resistance, increase

Read more of this post

Circles of Meaning


Once in a while, I like participating in the “Weekly Photo Challenge” over at The Daily Post. A new meme comes out each Friday and I think about the proposed topic. I wonder what I could say about it and what my readers will be interested in as well. This week, Cheri asks us to let a shape, a circle, inspire us.

Circles Change Management Business TimeI took this picture at the James J. Hill Business Library because it had a certain old world charm that grabbed my attention. I like the concept of time as it relates to the evolution of knowledge throughout the ages.

Circles have been used metaphorically since the beginning of history. In many cultures, they represent unity, enlightenment, divinity, and protection. At first glance, a circle can seem simple, yet they are one of the most common and universal signs used throughout the history of the world.

Circles have symbolic use in divinity: For example, with Taoism, the Yin Circles of Concern Influence Change ControlYang image embodies two forces in the universe that are opposites that balance one another. Hinduism uses the Dharma Chakra to represent the wheel of law that leads to enlightenment. Artists have used halos in Christianity and Buddhism to symbolize light and holiness. Paganism circles exemplified supernatural forces, and in ancient times Celtics stood inside of circles for protection. Read more of this post

Appreciation as Fuel


Fire at Kidani VillageSo I was staring at my computer screen and had an epiphany. The only thing I was processing was a blank stare, and I knew I had to get out to clear my mind. This month Minnesota is on target to experience the warmest December in history and on this day, it was just 31 degrees. I knew feeling the fresh air on my face was just what I needed because I do my best critical thinking when I am walking outside. I grabbed my walking shoes and was quickly out of the door.

Feeling the crisp, cool wind on my face, set the tone for this stroll and got me thinking about gratitude. A simple thank you goes such a long way and can be a ritual that begins a chain reaction which may surprise you. Appreciation is the fuel that warms people, inspires them to pay it forward and doesn’t take much extra effort.

Research has shown that expressing thankfulness increases confidence, connection, and feelings of competency. Engagement matters and when we find little ways to express appreciation it sends the message  “I see you” and it promotes teamwork and improves the sense of community. I like to think of gratitude as a multiplier because it increases emotional well-being and improves productivity. That, in turn, leads to innovation and creativity, which is when we do our best work.

I have a board on Pinterest called “Appreciation, which has some thoughtful ideas for expressing gratitude.

Take a look and let me know what you think. I want to hear from you. How do you show appreciation?

Please share your response below and thank you for visiting my blog!

Ritual, Change and Weisbord’s Future Search Conference


Organizational change creates unavoidable uncertainty, resistance, and chaos. Systems thinking can help in identifying negative consequences and to achieve positive outcomes. But the impact of transformation requires looking at people, groups and the larger system[1]. By taking this approach, organizations can build change coalitions with employees at all levels. In times of uncertainty, it is essential that everyone has the opportunity to provide input and feel empowered to make decisions.[2]

Formal rites of passage or rituals are important and often an overlooked tool to overcome these challenges. Rituals build culture, strengthen relationships and are Weisbords Future Search Conference Strategic Planningparticularly important for acknowledging challenges, celebrating wins or forging new paths. In times of change, stakeholders often need a way to declare it is time to say goodbye to the old way of doing things because there is no turning back. The idea of farewell as a process can pave the path towards embracing a shared vision for moving forward. Future Search Conference is one example of a tool that can help to successfully facilitate this process.

Read more of this post

Thirteen Behaviors that Build Trust in Relationships


Building trust is a process of modeling behavior shared vision and repeating messaging

Building trust is a process of modeling behavior, a shared vision and repeating messaging

What behaviors build trust in relationships?

Think about a time you were part of a really effective team that excelled at pulling together to achieve a shared outcome. What were the attributes that made it successful?

Research shows that teams who collaborate to attain a common end goal are usually high in trust. Success often relies on a group with a sense of shared values, vision and purpose. When all stakeholders are given opportunities to have input, they are inspired to build something together, so as to change leaders, how do we work to create a culture of trust? Recently I read Stephen Covey’s book called; “The Speed of Trust,” which looks at trust from three perspectives.

Read more of this post

Refracting Light Life | Kakie’s Corner


These pictures are from one of our first “free” nights in South East Asia, for the Global Business Systems Executive MBA Global Studies Course, Singaporecourse in the Executive MBA program. This evening four of us opted for dinner on the rooftop in Little India. I heard a calming sound of flapping water, came around the corner and this beautiful scenery, was what I encountered.

This week’s photo challenge asks that we show what “refraction” means to us. Refraction occurs when a ray of light is indirectly deflected by a wave of energy that passes from one medium to another, which causes the illumination to bend and become distorted. For example: water to light, air to glass etc.

I interpret “Refraction” as a metaphor for life. Read more of this post

Transition – Defining “Between”


Transitions - Adapting to ChangeToday’s post is about “between,” which comes in many forms. It made me consider the various ways we process and deal with change. Regardless of its application (professional, emotional or personal), the techniques for recognizing and approaching transition differs for each of us.

Sometimes it flows and feels natural, as captured in the photo for this post. A young man who is between testing for his next belt level in karate and receiving a new status because he is ready and has done the work. He has practiced learning the movement and techniques with precision and accuracy, and he knows that along with his sense of accomplishment come confidence and the long term rewards that follow.

In graduate school, we are taught that we should expect resistance when it comes to change in the workplace. The opposition is a natural part of the process during transformation and frequently rears its head when people do not understand why change is necessary, or there is not consistent support, repetition, and communication of the messaging. Read more of this post